Fuel Cells Powering Critical Infrastructure in Disasters
Fuel Cells Powering Critical Infrastructure in Disasters
author Added by FuelCellsWorks, January 10, 2017

This fact sheet from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office describes how organizations are looking at fuel cells as an attractive option for reliable backup power during natural disasters.

The United States’ power grid is 99.97% reliable, but when it fails, it is both disruptive and costly. Hurricanes, tornados, thunderstorms and other weather events—not to mention human error, animals, and mechanical failure—can knock out power and communications infrastructure that cost Americans at least $150 billion in economic losses each year.

Recognizing the vulnerabilities of grid dependency, organizations are looking at fuel cells as an attractive option for reliable backup power. After Superstorm Sandy slammed the Caribbean and the East Coast, fuel cells provided emergency backup power to at least 100 telecommunications towers in both the Bahamas and the Northeast United States.

During Hurricane Irene in 2011, ReliOn fuel cells kicked on at 56 Sprint cell towers, and Doosan fuel cells maintained power at both a storm shelter at South Windsor High School and a Whole Foods location in Connecticut.

To Read the Entire Report, please click HERE