Mission H24 - Hydrogen is Promising
Mission H24 - Hydrogen is Promising
author Added by FuelCellsWorks, September 22, 2018

There are no consumption or performance targets for Mission H24’s demonstration at Spa. The car on the track is a prototype (LMP3) that is still at the experimental phase. The development work has yet to begin.

So seeing the car complete its first few miles last January, and watching it set the pace as the leading car and clocking up top speeds of 300 kph is more than just promising.

Yannick Dalmas, driver of the leading car: “it’s a privilege to be part of such an event, to take the wheel of a hydrogen-powered car. I can assure you I was not at all worried about driving a car with hydrogen on board. Everything is perfectly under control with numerous safety measures and checks. The stealthy silence of the prototype as it leaves the pit lane is remarkable. It feels different to drive and I needed to have several procedures explained. For a machine that is yet to enter the development stage, the whole package is really promising. For a brand-new machine without any performance development, it’s really promising. More than all when you know that the only emission out of this car is water vapor! "

As a testimony for this very special day, the journalists and guests received a bottle of ‘Eau de Voiture’ collected from the exhaust of the LMPH2G. The following people were among the crowd at Spa for this first episode in the Mission H24 adventure and had this to say:

Nathalie Maillet, Managing Director of the Spa circuit: “We’re honoured that Spa is the venue for this world premier. We were eager to see the demonstration of a hydrogen racing car. It’s great that Spa is the launch pad for Mission H24." 
Pierre-Gautier Caloni, Vice President of Total’s Sponsorship and Racing division: “Once again, the competitive sphere serves as a superb testing ground to develop and boost the technology and the energy of the future and their applications. With a hydrogen-powered leading car on track, we’re making history here at Spa today."

Some people think that the hydrogen engine is a labyrinthine set-up but the hydrogen racing car is a simple hydrogen/hybrid vehicle

There are several ways of producing hydrogen and the ACO has naturally opted for ‘green’ hydrogen, i.e. that produced using a carbon-free process.

• ‘Green’ hydrogen can come from the fermenting of bioresources such as biomass, waste or methane.
• ‘Green’ hydrogen can be obtained using water electrolysis where the electricity is generated by renewable sources (water electrolysis applies an electrical current to split water into oxygen and hydrogen). 

Specs:

1.Electric motors: Four electric motors on the rear wheels (two on each) provide propulsion.

2.Three hydrogen reservoirs: The dihydrogen (H2) is stored in three pressurized (700 bars) carbon filament tanks used to fuel the cell. The first two are placed either side of the cockpit and the third just behind the driver.

3.Hydrogen fuel-cell: Comprises four stacks, at the core of which molecules of dihydrogen (H2, stored in the tanks) and oxygen atoms combine to form water molecules (H2O). This reaction produces heat, and electricity, which powers the car’s electric motor.

4.The stack A layered pile of 230 cells, bipolar plates and hydrogen porous membranes.

5.Air Intake: The ambient air used to produce the reaction within the stacks enters through this vent. It is filtered, propelled towards the compressor, then the humidifier, before entering the stacks.

6.Buffer batteries: Excess electricity produced by the hydrogen fuel-cell and by the KERS system (when braking) feeds into high-performance cells. The driver can therefore double the car’s acceleration potential (250–480 kw, the equivalent of 653 hp).

7.Transmission : A special, clutchless one-gear gear box manages rear wheels independently and is designed to reduce grinding.

8.Compressor: Compresses and accelerates the air that enters via the vent (up to 300g per second). It operates at up to 100000 revolutions per minute. The modulation of the air flow injected in the stacks alters the reaction and therefore determines the amount of electric power produced. 

9.Humidifier: Humidified air improves the interaction between oxygen atoms and dihydrogen molecules. The humidifier ensures the level of humidity of the air injected in the stacks remains constant.

10.Radiators and cooling system

11.Exhaust: The only emission produced by the GreenGT LMPH2G is water (H2O). Steam escapes through four vents (one per stack) to the rear of the car, in the middle of the aerodynamic diffuser

LMPH2G TECHNICAL DATA

1.Electric motors: Four electric motors on the rear wheels (two on each) provide propulsion.

2.Three hydrogen reservoirs: The dihydrogen (H2) is stored in three pressurized (700 bars) carbon filament tanks used to fuel the cell. The first two are placed either side of the cockpit and the third just behind the driver.

3.Hydrogen fuel-cell: Comprises four stacks, at the core of which molecules of dihydrogen (H2, stored in the tanks) and oxygen atoms combine to form water molecules (H2O). This reaction produces heat, and electricity, which powers the car’s electric motor.

4.The stack A layered pile of 230 cells, bipolar plates and hydrogen porous membranes.

5.Air Intake: The ambient air used to produce the reaction within the stacks enters through this vent. It is filtered, propelled towards the compressor, then the humidifier, before entering the stacks.

6.Buffer batteries: Excess electricity produced by the hydrogen fuel-cell and by the KERS system (when braking) feeds into high-performance cells. The driver can therefore double the car’s acceleration potential (250–480 kw, the equivalent of 653 hp).

7.Transmission : A special, clutchless one-gear gear box manages rear wheels independently and is designed to reduce grinding.

8.Compressor: Compresses and accelerates the air that enters via the vent (up to 300g per second). It operates at up to 100000 revolutions per minute. The modulation of the air flow injected in the stacks alters the reaction and therefore determines the amount of electric power produced. 

9.Humidifier: Humidified air improves the interaction between oxygen atoms and dihydrogen molecules. The humidifier ensures the level of humidity of the air injected in the stacks remains constant.

10.Radiators and cooling system

11.Exhaust: The only emission produced by the GreenGT LMPH2G is water (H2O). Steam escapes through four vents (one per stack) to the rear of the car, in the middle of the aerodynamic diffuser

LMPH2G TECHNICAL DATA

Chassis: 
• Carbon LMP Chassis with steel frame
• double wishbone pushrod suspension
• carbon brakes Engine:
• GreenGT electric-hydrogen powertrain (4-stack fuel cell with polymer electrolyte membrane) producing a constant 250kW
• 4 electric motors (2 per rear wheel)
• Maximum output of 480 kW at 13000 revs (653 hp)
• 2.4kWh KERS delivering 250 kW for 20 seconds

Transmission: 
• Direct drive to rear wheels (ratio: 1:6.3)
• No gear box, no clutch, no mechanical differential • Electronic torque management system

Hydrogen Storage: 
• Fuel tank capacity: 8.6kg of hydrogen
• Storage pressure: 700 bars Kinetic energy recovery system (KERS):
• 750V battery, nominal voltage
• Capacity: 2.4 kWh

Measurements: 
• Length: 4 710 mm • Height: 1 070 mm
• Width: 1 970 mm • Wheelbase: 2 970 mm
• Front overhang: 1 000 mm
• Rear overhang: 740 mm • Weight: 1 420 kg in working order (front: 39,8 % - rear: 60,2 %)
• Weight variation at refuel: 8.6kg Wheels:
• Front 30/68-18 Michelin Pilot Sport GT (hub 12X18)
• Rear 31/71-18 Michelin Pilot Sport GT (hub 13X18) Performance:
• Maximum speed: + 300 kph • 0–100 kph: 3.4 seconds
• 400 metres, standing start: 11 seconds
• Range: equivalent to other racing cars with comparable performance
• Refuelling time: 3 minutes.

Emissions into the atmosphere:
• Water vapour only

• Carbon LMP Chassis with steel frame
• double wishbone pushrod suspension
• carbon brakes Engine:
• GreenGT electric-hydrogen powertrain (4-stack fuel cell with polymer electrolyte membrane) producing a constant 250kW
• 4 electric motors (2 per rear wheel)
• Maximum output of 480 kW at 13000 revs (653 hp)
• 2.4kWh KERS delivering 250 kW for 20 seconds

Mission H24 - Hydrogen is safe

There are many preconceptions about hydrogen, one of which is that it is dangerous. Discovered by Henry Cavendish in 1776, hydrogen and its properties are now well known and today the risks have been pinpointed and contained by safety measures and standards.

Fire prevention professionals now consider hydrogen safer than any other fuel used in the open air. It goes without saying that storage tanks meet the strictest requirements in terms of resistance.

At Spa, the refuelling pitstop will put an end to any fears about the safety of storage or refuelling. The operation will be completed by an operator wearing normal clothes. With no need for overalls or helmet, they will simply have to fit the valve and job done!

Or almost. Hydrogen (gas) is contained in sealed tanks at 700-bar pressure. The tank’s seals and contents are systematically checked before the hydrogen is injected.

Today, there is an array of safety standards which are applied across the globe. In Paris, several service stations supply a fleet of hydrogen-powered taxis.