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China: Handong University Opens New Research Institute to Develop New Technology For Hydrogen Energy

By May 5, 2020 2   min read  (356 words)

May 5, 2020 |

On the 30th of April, Handong University inaugurated the Energy Convergence Research Institute (ECTI), dedicated to the development of new hydrogen technologies for use in the energy sector.

A new “hydrogen energy” technology is being developed by the University’s Institute of Energy and Environmental Sciences and Technology (DEET) in collaboration with the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS).

The research team consists of a six-person master and doctoral team, and the first research institute is headed by Dr. Park Seung-hoon, a professor in the Faculty of Energy and Environmental Sciences and Technology. Korean companies as well as a specialized energy company based in Pohang, Gyeongbuk, for the development of hydrogen energy.

The technology ECTI intends to develop is the production of hydrogen and its conversion into a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), but the technology has not been commercialized domestically or globally. The aim is to develop a system that makes it possible to generate hydrogen with the high-temperature steam of the S FC, which is then converted into liquid fuel in the form of liquid hydrogen gas.

On the 30th, Handong University inaugurated the Energy Convergence Research Institute (ECTI), dedicated to the development of new hydrogen technologies for use in the energy sector. A new “hydrogen energy” technology is being developed by the University’s Institute of Energy and Environmental Sciences and Technology (DEET) in collaboration with the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS).

The research team consists of a six-person master and doctoral team, and the first research institute is headed by Dr. Park Seung-hoon, a professor in the Faculty of Energy and Environmental Sciences and Technology. Korean companies as well as a specialized energy company based in Pohang, Gyeongbuk, for the development of hydrogen energy.

The technology ECTI intends to develop is the production of hydrogen and its conversion into a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), but the technology has not been commercialised domestically or globally. The aim is to develop a system that makes it possible to generate hydrogen with the high-temperature steam of the SO FC, which is then converted into a liquid fuel in the form of liquid hydrogen gas (LNG).

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